Our Offerings

Coffee beans are a globally traded commodity, and each regoin has their own harvest season. Becuase of this, our coffee selection continually rotates. Below you'll find each of the coffees we currently offer with a detailed portfolio, as well as the location on the map.

Brazil - Carmo de Minas

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Colombia Huila - Decaf

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Ethiopia Guji

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Guatemala San Pedro

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Peru Lima

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Burundi Microlot

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Burundi - Commune of Rango

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Democratic Republic of the Congo - Bishange Village

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Guatemala - El Chalum

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Ethiopia Yirgacheffe - Halu Beriti - Special Preparation

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Brazil - Carmo de Minas

Country:

Brazil

Region:

Carmo de Minas, Minas Gerais

Altitdue:

900–1050 masl

Variety:

Yellow Bourbon

Harvest Process:

Pulped Natural

Shop Brazil - Carmo de Minas

Cup Notes: Sweet with grapefruit acidity and a syrup-y mouthfeel; guava, brown sugar, grape skin and vanilla tea flavors.

Coffee growing in Carmo de Minas has been the business of the Pereira family since 1979. When the family started managing the 215-hectare farmland at Fazenda Santa Ines, it was already planted in coffee, but they opted to plant new varieties and update the work model in order to improve quality and productivity. At the time the family took over management at Santa Ines, the Carmo de Minas region was experiencing problems with quality. The family hired experts to help improve quality, they introduced new harvesting/processing techniques, and they also implemented the newest farm technology available. Since making these changes, the coffees from Santa Ines have stood out in regional and national contests: In 2005, a sample from Fazenda Santa Ines won first place in Cup of Excellence Brazil, with a world-record 95.85 score. The farm is planted with Catucai, Yellow and Red Catuai, Yellow and Red Bourbon, and Acaia on about 100 hectares; the rest of the farmland is used for bananas, corn, and dairy cows. Annual coffee production is around 4,000 bags. "In Carmo, soil and climatic conditions are favorable to the coffee. It is what French people call terroir and our region is doing its homework; we are on the right way. Now we can only expect better times," the family says.

Colombia Huila - Decaf

Country:

Colombia

Region:

Huila

Altitdue:

1200–2000 masl

Variety:

Castillo, Caturra, Colombia

Harvest Process:

Washed, Ethyl Acetate decaffeinated

Shop Colombia Huila - Decaf

Cup Notes: Mild, sweet and clean with citric acidity; graham and lemon flavors.

Take advantage of a great program dedicated to bringing the highest-quality, non-chemical-processed decaf coffees to market. Our Origin Select Decaf offerings are single-origin blends of coffees selected by cup quality grown by multiple smallholder producers. Our Colombian E.A. (ethyl acetate) decafs are cupped as regular green samples and specifically identified for decaffeination, which happens in-country in Colombia before the coffee goes to export. This allows us to maintain both the integrity of the quality of the coffees we choose to decaf, but also to extend our intentional and responsible sourcing to our decaf offerings as well as our "regular." This process works by soaking green coffee in a bath of water and a solvent called ethyl acetate, which is naturally derived from fermented sugar, among other natural sources. The solvent bonds to the salts of chlorogenic acid within the coffee, which allows for the extraction of caffeine. The coffee is removed from its bath and steamed at low pressure to ensure no traces of E.A. are left, and the finished product is almost entirely free of any but the most trivial (0.1–0.3%) caffeine content.

Ethiopia Guji

Country:

Ethiopia

Region:

Haro Wachu, Uraga, Oromia, Guji

Altitdue:

2100–2310 masl

Variety:

Bourbon, Typica

Harvest Process:

Natural

Shop Ethiopia Guji

Cup Notes: Sweet with tart acidity and a delicate mouthfeel; coffee cherry, cocoa and lime flavors.

The Wolichu Wachu washing station was founded in 2017 and serves 4,500 local smallholder producers in and around the town of Haro Wachu, in the Urga district of Guhi in the Oromia region of Ethiopia. The average producer here farms on half a hectare of land, and delivers coffee in cherry form to the washing station, where it is processed as necessary. Natural lots like this one are sorted, then laid to dry on raised beds for 8–15 days in sunny weather and 15–20 days in cloudy weather. According to the washing station manager, 90 percent of the coffee delivered to the factory is Bourbon, and 10 percent is Typica.

Guatemala San Pedro

Country:

Guatemala

Region:

San Pedro, Atitlan

Altitdue:

1500–1600 masl

Variety:

Bourbon, Catuai, Caturra, Typica

Harvest Process:

Washed

Shop Guatemala San Pedro

Cup Notes: Mellow, citric and clean with toffee, almond and dark chocolate flavor with an herbal aftertaste.

Throughout the harvest, many lots from San Pedro, Atitlan, were cupped and classified according to their quality and profile. The most representative lots were selected to form this blended lot from various smallholders in the area; we think it is the best expression of what this region can offer. The coffees here develop clean sweetness and sparkling acidity due to the combination of rich volcanic soil, good elevation, an average rainfall of about 2,000 mm, and a relatively cool average temperature. Atitlan’s soil is rich with organic matter; about 90% of coffee in Atitlan is cultivated along volcanic slopes that surround Lake Atitlan. Daily winds stir the cold lake waters, influencing variations in the microclimates of the region.

Peru Lima

Country:

Peru

Region:

Jaén, Cajamarca

Altitdue:

1650–1800 masl

Variety:

Caturra, Typica, Catimor, Mundo Novo, Pache

Harvest Process:

Washed

Shop Peru Lima

Cup Notes: Mellow and sweet with fruit acidity and a smooth mouthfeel; floral with toffee and citrus fruits.

Rony Lavan is an ambitious and quality-driven cupper who has spent his career trying to carve out better and bolder coffees from small producers in Peru. While the country is emerging as a specialty market after many years of focusing on bigger lots and certifications, Rony's passion is with identifying and developing the top scores and the best cups. As president of the young Lima Coffees exporting organization, Rony has already established himself as standing at the fore of microlot-quality coffees in Cajamarca. His first year with Lima Coffees, he entered the national competition and won; with the introduction of the Cup of Excellence competition to Peru in 2017, the country is poised to enter the international spotlight for its finest offerings. Rony and his coffees will be the ones to watch.

Burundi Microlot

Country:

Africa

Region:

Gitega, Karuzi, Kayanza, Kirundo, Muyinga, Ngozi

Variety:

Bourbon

Harvest Process:

Natural

Shop Burundi Microlot

Cup Notes: Citric and heavy with an herbal-grapefruit aftertaste.

Deep in the heart of Africa is the tiny country Burundi, and deep in Burundi is Cafe Imports: We have been trekking to this gem of a place just south of Rwanda on Lake Tanganyika since 2006, and Cafe Imports was one of the very first companies to see the great potential in specialty coffees here—not only for their profile, which is exquisite, as complex as Kenya but as versatile as a top-flight Colombian; but also for the economic possibilities that specialty coffee offers. Coffee in Burundi is a logistical challenge from start to finish, even for the best of us. It is a particularly poor country, with one of the lowest GDP in Africa, and recent years have brought renewed political struggles and unrest that hark back to very troubled times in the late 1990s and early 2000s. The country’s landlocked position on the continent is also tricky to navigate: Rather than being sold FOB (Free on Board), as most coffees are once they arrive at port and are loaded onto a container, coffees from Rwanda, Burundi, and Democratic Republic of Congo are traded FOT, or Free on Truck—a much riskier arrangement as it requires an incredibly long haul from the processing mill to a port that’s as many as three countries and up to a week’s travel time removed. Despite the surface similarities that Burundi and Rwanda share on paper with regards to varieties, processing, farmer profile, and history (the two nations are often lumped together on offerings sheets and in the "story" of African coffees), they are practically night and day in the cup: The sparkling acidity of Burundi and the incredible complexity and diversity that’s possible here is absolutely a product of the terroir, and the taste of the place is as beautiful and varied as the place itself. We are in love with the coffees, the people, and the country of Burundi, and by continuing to invest in buying microlots from our washing-station partners, we are able to consistently offer our customers what we believe are some of the most interesting and most consistently high-cupping coffees from Africa.

Burundi - Commune of Rango

Country:

Burundi

Region:

Rango, Kayanza

Altitdue:

1650 masl

Variety:

Bourbon, Jackson, Mibirizi

Harvest Process:

Washed

Shop Burundi - Commune of Rango

Cup Notes: Heavy, juicy, sweet and citric with caramel, toffee, lime, and lemongrass.

Gacokwe Washing Station is located in the town of Rango, which is located in Burundi's Kayanza province. Roughly 2,000 coffee producers in the area deliver coffee to the station, either directly or to six local collection points that are affiliated to Gacokwe. Farmers here own less than half a hectare of land, on average, and in addition to growing coffee, they also grow crops like bananas, beans, yams, taro, and cassava, both for sale and for household use. Due to the small size and yield on the average coffee farm or plot, washing stations are the primary point of purchase for us in Burundi. Unlike other coffee-growing regions in Central and South America where landholdings are slightly larger and coffee-centric resources are more available, most producers do not have space on their property or the financial means to do their wet- or dry-milling. Instead, the majority of growers deliver cherry to a facility that does sorting, blending, and post-harvest processing of day lots to create different offerings. Since 2006, we have cupped coffees from more than 50 washing stations in an attempt to pinpoint those with the best practices, cleanest cups, and most high-quality nearby farms. While the logistics of buying coffees from Burundi are extremely challenging, we love the heavy figgy, fruity, and lively coffees we find here—they remind us like a Malbec, with a firm support of acidity.

Democratic Republic of the Congo - Bishange Village

Country:

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Region:

Bishange Village, Masisi Territory, North-Kivu Province

Altitdue:

2000 masl

Variety:

Blue Mountain, Bourbon, Caturra, Catuai, Kabare 2

Harvest Process:

Fully Washed

Shop Democratic Republic of the Congo - Bishange Village

Cup Notes: Tart, sweet, rich and savory with citrus fruit and floral flavors.

SOPACDI (Solidarité Paysanne pour la Promotion des Actions Café et Development Intégral) is an organization comprising more than 5,600 farmers, roughly 20 percent of whom are women, located near Lake Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Each farmer has a very small area of farmland for coffee (fewer than 2 hectares on average), and tenders cherries to SOPACDI through the organization's 10 collection subgroups. Joachim Munganga, who was a farmer himself, founded SOPACDI in 2003 by restoring a washing station in the area, which provided service and market access to the growers in these extremely remote highlands. Before he undertook this work, farmers had little to no means to transport coffee to the markets, and instead were forced to simply barter their coffee locally for food, clothing, and necessities. The cooperative was the first to achieve Fair Trade certification in Congo, and the coffee also carries organic certification. Members of the cooperative represent several different ethnic groups, speaking Kirundi, Kinyarwanda, and Kihavu, and many of the women members are widows. These coffees are traceable to the individual washing stations, where members will deliver their coffee in cherry form and receive payment for what they bring, based on volume. After that point the coffee is sorted and will be separated into lots depending on the day and the quality, which makes it impossible to know which farmers’ coffees are in which lots. At this washing station, coffee is depulped the day it is delivered, and fermented dry for 12 hours. Then it spends 12 under water before being passed through the washing canal, and then it is soaked for an additional 12 hours. The coffee is dried on raised beds under a cover of shade for 14–20 days. This particular washing station serves 688 producers, including 241 women. The group represents about 265 total hectares of coffee farmland, which is just over 1/3 hectare per producer on average.

Guatemala - El Chalum

Country:

Guatemala

Region:

El Chalum, La Libertad, Huehuetenango

Altitdue:

1700 masl

Variety:

Caturra, Pacamara, Pache

Harvest Process:

Washed

Shop Guatemala - El Chalum

Cup Notes: Balanced, sweet and soft with chocolate, caramel and lemon flavors.

Los Dos Socios is a 10-manzana farm with 3,500 coffee trees per manzana, planted under shade. Coffees are picked and depulped the same day, then fermented dry for 18–24 hours before being washed three times laid on patios and nylon tarps to dry for 3.5–6 days, weather depending

Ethiopia Yirgacheffe - Halu Beriti - Special Preparation

Country:

Ethiopia

Region:

Gedeb, Yirgacheffe

Altitdue:

2100–2300 masl

Variety:

Heirloom Ethiopian varieties

Harvest Process:

Washed

Shop Ethiopia Yirgacheffe - Halu Beriti - Special Preparation

Cup Notes: Rich sweetness with big fruit acidity and a smooth mouthfeel; very floral with jasmine, apricot, peach, citrus fruit and an almond aftertaste.

Halu Beriti Washing Station was established in 2014 and serves 750 smallholder producers, who deliver their coffee in cherry form. For this special-preparation Washed lot, the coffee undergoes a fermentation time of 48–72 hours. It is washed clean, then soaked for 8–16 hours, then washed one more time before being dried on raised beds for 9–12 days.